Tag Archives: Overhead

The 8 Traits Of Great Companies! Traits 5 through 8

Competition | Pro-active Sales | Operational Systems | Investments
Part 3

Trait #5 – Set your company apart from your competition!
When I drive down the freeway and see contractors’ trucks, they often have signs on like: “Joe’s Electric – Commercial, Industrial & Residential.” I chuckle and ask myself: “What do they excel at, what kind of jobs are they the expert in, and why should I hire them?” Based on my experience working with tens of thousands of contractors, my best guess is they chase any kind of work they can get and don’t make a lot of money doing it.

Are you in the “Yes” Business taking any kind of job or project thrown your way? Experience shows that companies who specialize in a specific type of project or service do better work, are more competitive, have more loyal customers, and make a lot more money than their “jack of all trades” competitors. Perceived experts are the first called when a customer needs a professional to complete a tough or special project. Experts get the first chance to propose on jobs which require complex engineering or technical knowledge.

To set your company apart from your competition and get hired at higher prices, you must be the perceived expert in your market and offer more than your competitors. According to a survey from the Society of Marketing Professional Services (a national association of construction sales and marketing professionals), the top two reasons construction companies don’t get awarded projects are 1) Their inability to market and properly present the differences between themselves and their competition, and 2) Their lack of expertise in a particular project or service niche. When you continue to be and do everything for everyone, you won’t have enough time to satisfy your customers and you can’t make enough money for all the different types of work you attempt to complete. Continue reading

Advertisements

Construction Risk Is a 5 Letter Word! (part 2 of 3)

The biggest risk and opportunity to make or lose money is… LABOR! Let’s look at a typical job breakdown to see what happens if labor runs over budget by 5%.

Typical Construction Contract Budget

Labor $40,000
Materials $40,000
Equipment $10,000
Subcontractors $10,000
Subtotal $100,000
Overhead @ 10% $10,000
Profit @ 5% $5000
Contract Amount  $115,000

The 5% Factor = 100% More Net Profit!
Most construction companies only make an average annual net profit between 2% to 3%. If you can IMPROVE your LABOR costs by only 5%, you can IMPROVE your net profit amount to 4% to 5%. This can be as much as a 100% increase in your bottom-line!

If you can improve your labor by 5% in the example above, your net profit will increase to $7,000, or from 5% to 7% net profit. And if you improve your labor by 10%, your net profit will increase to $9,000, or from 5% to 9% net profit. This is real money and will put you far ahead of your competition and give you some breathing room to invest back into your company.

But, if you overrun labor by a small 5% amount, you’ll spend $2,000 more than your labor budget and reduce your profit margin to only $3,000, or to 3% net profit. If you overrun you labor by 10%, your net profit will be reduced to only $1,000, and 1% net profit.

Is your crew working efficiently?
Consider how productive your crew is everyday out in the field. Studies of typical construction field crews show revealing facts and much room for improvement. Field employees spend some of their time planning the work. Then they produce the work. Some of the time they support the work doing layout, seeking information, fixing equipment, looking for tools, repairing tools, locating the right material, and asking questions. And of course some of the time is wasted goofing off, standing around, starting late, quitting early, extending their breaks, smoking, making personal cell phone calls, waiting deliveries, running out of materials, or taking care of their dogs loose on the jobsite.

Typical Construction Field Productivity

2% Planning work 0.2 hrs /day
40% Producing work  3.2 hrs /day
25% Support  work 2.0 hrs /day
33% Wasting time 2.6 hrs /day

Do these results shock you? Go out to any job site and look around for a few hours or days. Just sit and watch what really goes on. You will be under-impressed and appalled. So where do you start to improve productivity? It starts with identifying the areas that take away form your crew’s efficiency. Look for things that slow down production, create down time, or allow them to be less than productive. Some things that hurt your field productivity include:

– When the superint./foreman leaves site
– 5 trips to hardware store per day
– Run out of materials or small supplies
– Tools break or don’t work properly
– Wrong equipment for the job
– Waiting for right equipment to show
– Smoking while working
– Cell phone calls
– Dogs running wild
– Not starting on time
– Quitting early
– Breaks and lunch time extended
– Bad attitude employees

Win the race!
NASCAR is a good model to follow. At each pit stop, there is no time to waste, as every second counts and can cost the team millions of dollars if they loose any time. How can you get your crew to win the race and become:
– super efficient
– super fast
– super productive
– super organized

Focus on the 5% factor!
The dilemma for most contractors is a downward spiral and never ending treadmill. When you try to do it all yourself, you aren’t focused on field productivity. You get too busy taking care of small tasks that need to be done but don’t make you money. When you’re too busy to meet with your supervisors regularly to help them plan properly, problems continually happen. You only have enough time to react and fight fires. This causes your crews to stand around and wait for you to get them answers or needed materials.

You know you are losing money and your crews are inefficient as they waaste more time than they should. But you don’t have enough time to stay out on the jobsite all day to tell them what to do and keep them working faster. So you rely on untrained foreman to get the work done. These supervisors have no incentive to work at a high productivity rate, so they do what they feel is fast enough based on their experiences over the years. Besides, what’s the worse that could happen to them? You come out a few times a year and tell them they’re over budget and try to get everyone working a little faster. Not much of a productivity improvement program.