Tag Archives: bidding

What Is Your Bidding Strategy?

After you have established reasons why customers should hire your company, now it’s time to find jobs to bid where you can be successful. Your overall estimating and bidding strategy is to get enough signed contracts at your price to cover your job costs, overhead, and then make a profit. This requires several winning plans. The first strategy is to have a strategy! Many contractors bid any job they are offered to bid. They don’t have a strategy that helps them decide which jobs to bid and when to say no. What’s your estimating and bidding strategy?

Before agreeing to bid a project, create a list of questions to determine if you will have an excellent chance to win the contract.

 1. Do you want to negotiate the project?
– How will you convince the customer to negotiate with you?

2. Do you want to be the select or only bidder?
– How will you implement this strategy?

3. Do you want to get the last look?
– How will you make this happen?

4. Do you know your bid-success ratio against your competitors?
– How do you keep track of your success versus competitors?

5. Do you have competitors you don’t want to compete against?
– How will you discover this information?

6. Do you have some competitors you will bid against?
– How will insure the bid list gives you a chance to be awarded a contract?

7. Do you have an ideal number of bidders you’ll bid against?
– How will you insure this happens?

8. Do you have a maximum number of bidders you’ll bid against?
 – How will you decide when not to bid a job? Continue reading

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Low Bid Gets the Job In Public Work

In public works construction, the low bidder usually gets the job and there is little or no room for sales strategy or tactics. The best way to be the low bidder and awarded a contract is to have the lowest possible costs and the most efficient construction management and field operation possible. To keep your costs lower than your competitors, your field crews must be lean, productive, and well trained. There must be no downtime, job problems, quality issues, coordination conflicts, or mistakes. Your subcontractors and suppliers must also be supervised and managed tight without gaps in scheduling, productivity, conflicts, or quality. This can only be accomplished with diligent leadership, accountable management, and ongoing training focused on productivity and efficiency.

Now you are in the sales business!
In private work, it takes a lot more than just bidding and negotiating to win contracts. You’ve got to give customers a differentiating reason to hire your company. It’s not just about the price, inclusions, and exclusions. Now there are too many competitors who can do the same job as your company and will cut their bid below their cost to get a job. To win more contracts at your price, you must face reality. You are not in the construction business. You now have to also be in the $ALES business! Continue reading

Contracting is not just about construction!

How can construction companies increase their steady stream of ongoing reliable sales income regardless of the economy? What type of ongoing revenue can your company, employees, infrastructure, technical skills, reputation, equipment, knowledge, customer base, experience, or potential generate? Attendees of my two day Profit-Builder Circles come to learn how to get their business to work the way they want them to and then take them to the next level. As I look back over the hundreds of past attendees, the business owners who are the most successful are the ones who have two types of contracts, revenue sources, customers, and business models. They do both lump sum contracting work plus have a significant amount of their revenue come from steady ongoing service accounts.

These successful contractors don’t rely solely on bidding single jobs, one at a time, to generate most of their revenue. When you mainly rely on bidding or negotiating work to win contracts, your business becomes ‘fast and furious.’ Your business is either hot or cold, fast paced or dead, busy or slow, and you cant’ control your workload and your revenue isn’t steady or reliable.

‘Slow & steady’ business keeps your crews busy as the workload keeps on coming regularly over and over every month. You can count on a steady flow of work as annual service contracts provide ongoing revenue. With steady regular service accounts, you can plan your schedule, workload, and cash-flow.

Multiple types of income, contracts, and revenue sources compliment each other. This business model allows these type of companies who do both bid and service work, to become very efficient, generate steady workflow for their employees, and create wealth for the owners. But they require two different types of management, sales efforts, cost accounting, customer service, employee training, professional standards, and marketing efforts.

Steve is an electrical contractor who has two separate companies that work together. He has a new construction division that bids to general contractors and does commercial projects, large shopping centers, and office buildings. He has ten steady general contractor customers who typically give his company enough work to make a small profit during good times.

As an offshoot to his contracting company, Steve started an electrical service company several years ago that installs, services, and maintains back-up power generators for homeowners, commercial facilities, industrial plants, hospitals, government buildings, and offices. This company seeks annual contracts for all service work required to keep customer’s buildings electrified during power failures. This specialty service work includes design, engineering, preparing studies, permitting, new installation, repairs, maintenance, testing, fueling, implementing technology, and ongoing monitoring work to insure the generators will work when needed. This service business has grown as he has focused on acquiring new customers, providing excellent customer service, regular weekly employee training, and lots of sales and marketing to attract potential customers. Continue reading