Tag Archives: Approvals

The 5% Factor: 5% Faster jobs = More profit! (part 3 of 3)

How can you make your jobs finish only five or ten percent faster? Many of these critical scheduling factors can cause major delays:

– permits
– procurement
– submittals
– approvals
– material selections
– long lead items
– probable delays
– potential problems
– anticipated conflicts
– critical decisions
– phasing issues

 Time is easy money!
Those major factors can cause your projects to take longer. But we are looking for the little things that really cost you money. When you don’t focus on faster, it doesn’t happen and you let your crews go with the flow. When you focus on speed, you get the whole team moving faster and becoming more efficient. When you start every project, get the easy money flowing by getting your supervisor and crew together. Explain the projected and budgeted schedule. And then ask them to brainstorm ideas how they can improve the schedule by a minimum 5% to 10%. Explain to them how 5% faster will translate into dollars and will keep your company competitive in the tougher

 Squish the Schedule 5% or more!

Total projected sch. = 100 crew days
Total bud. @ $3,000 /day = $300,000
Beat the sch. by 5% = Save 5 days
Total crew savings = $15,000
Beat the sch. by 10% = Save 10 days
Total crew savings = $30,000

In addition to saving on your crew labor budget, the overall project will finish faster as well. You will save even more money concurrently on general conditions, equipment, clean-up, temporary facilities, and supervision costs. This money adds up fast!

Miracles can happen!
Years ago in July, I was on a job-site meeting with my superintendent and concrete foreman. I asked them when they were going to erect and tilt-up the exterior concrete wall panels on a large warehouse project. They both told me they were planning on tilting-up on November 15th. That seemed too long a schedule to me for our 20 man crew to get the work done. So I asked them how they arrived at that date. They told me they met with the crane company and thought that date was ‘doable’ and they could easily make it happen.

I didn’t like their answer so I asked if they could finish a few weeks faster. They both squirmed and didn’t want to answer or commit. Then I asked if they could finish by October 25th if I offered them each a $1,000 incentive. In less than ten seconds, they both said they could make the faster October 25th date. A miraculous change of mind by two veterans. And they made the new date. It cost me $2,000 and saved me 15 days for 20 men. You do the math.

Sometimes we have to get creative to get the results we want. When we go with the flow, we don’t push our people, and it costs us real money. When you compete, you run a little faster. When I used to swim in high school, I always went faster in the meets than in practice. Competition makes people go faster. Challenges make people work harder. So do games where you keep score and can declare a winner. I like to say: ‘No score, no game!’ What incentives can you offer to get your crew excited about beating the schedule?

Annual Savings @ 5% Faster

20 Crew @ 200 days @ $35 /hr
Labor savs. w/5% faster sch.
Equip. costs saved – 4 pcs @ $50/hr
Costs saved 4 jobs @ $1,000/day
Tot. Annual Savings = More Profit

Trash your old tools!
Another consideration is the working condition of your tools and equipment, and their overall effect on your crew efficiency. When is the last time you did a tool inventory or a detailed equipment analysis? Some you should keep, trash, replace, or upgrade. Field workers tend to use old, broken, or bandaged tools and equipment rather than admit to the boss that they might be broken or worn out. How much money are old unproductive tools or broken down equipment costing you?

The added benefits of having quality tools and great equipment will be increased crew teamwork, improved morale, more pride of workmanship, better quality, less mistakes, safer projects, and more efficiency. This will translate into even faster jobs and more bottom-line profits for your company.

Poor Production = Poor Profits!
Do you think your crew wastes at least 3 to 6 minutes per hour? Those few minutes are costing you a ton of money.

20 Person Crew 5% Time Lost
Time lost /person = 3 minutes /hr
Time lost /day /crew = 8 hours /day
Total hours lost = 1,600 hrs /yr
Crew labor rate @ $35.00 /hr
Annual Prod. Lab. LOST = $ 56,000 /yr

There are many ways to improve crew efficiency and finish your jobs faster. Start by taking a hard look at your start time, break time, lunch time, and quitting time. Does stop working at 3:30 pm mean start rolling up at 3:00 pm or 3:10 pm or 3:30 pm? For a 20 person crew, every minute you lose per day costs you as much as $2,500 per year or more.

Double your Profits!
Call an all crew team meeting and discuss ways to improve your schedule, save a few minutes every hour, define your exact hours for production expected, create meaningful incentives, improve your tools and equipment, increase efficiency, and strive to implement the 5% factor to get more everyday from everyone.

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The 5% Factor: Produce More To Make More (part 1 of 3)

In the good old days, construction companies were owned and run by builders. These proud, tough, hard working men (and women) learned their trade in the field, had years of practical experience, and knew what it took to get their projects finished on-time. If they didn’t produce quality workmanship, they didn’t last long. Back then it was all about getting the work done no matter what it took to meet their obligations. It was about delivering solid structures with unsurpassed craftsmanship. The contracts were negotiated face to face and enacted with handshakes based on integrity, reputation, trust, one’s word, and doing what’s right. It was all about building a project the contractor could remember, be proud of, and then rely on their customers for recommendations and new work.

Fast forward to today. Now successful construction companies are run by professional managers, engineers, and accountants. These business leaders are focused on the bottom-line and following what is only required by the contract. These managers have college degrees and little or no construction field experience. It’s now about paperwork, documentation, notices, claims, and tracking systems. Building the project isn’t as important as getting the work, doing the paperwork, and getting paid, even if it involves litigation.

Combine this lack of real field construction experience at the top of many companies today with the lower and lower profit margins. Years ago there was not enough qualified construction companies to handle all the work available in the marketplace. Under this business climate, contractors could afford to always do a little extra to insure a perfect project and still make a good profit.

More demands = less profits!
But over the last 40 years, the number of contractors has tripled while the total amount of construction has stayed relatively flat (adjusted for inflation). Therefore now there are more contractors than needed to do all the work required by the market. This has created a price squeeze and reduced contractor’s ability to do more than the minimum required by their contract. In addition, with increasing competition, construction customers are now demanding more than ever before. They now demand faster schedules, safer projects, better quality, more communications, better technology, all at much lower prices.

These added customer demands on contractors who are willing to sign contracts for less than they should, have killed the construction business as it once was. Add to these demands poor architectural plans, problematic engineering, incomplete specifications, conflicting contract documents, material shortages, price fluxuations, more regulations, added paperwork, lender’s requirements, third party inspections, construction managers, and red tape, has all but eliminated a fair profit for the risk contractors take.

It’s time to refocus on the field!
These issues have put pressure on contractors to save more and more money in the field. The average crew size has increased, while the number of experienced field workers on the crews have decreased. Training is a thing of the past as most employers have eliminated it as an unnecessary expense. Superintendents and foreman are younger than ever which also translates into less experienced field leadership and less efficient crews. This has resulted in poor or flat field productivity improvements over the last twenty years. Consider your challenges fighting against competitors who charge less than they should, have inexperienced and untrained field crews, and building projects that now require more paperwork and increased risk. A need now emerges for contractors to refocus on improving field productivity as their only viable solution to compete and improve their profit margins.

Construction profitability is about reducing risk. Contracts require contractors to assume more risk than ever today. Have you considered what’s at stake?

Types Of Construction Business Risk:

– Project Loc. & Access – Project Type & Sz
– Project Sch. & Duration – Constructability
– Customer – Architect, Eng. & Consultants
– Contract Terms – Financial , Funding & Pymt.
– Regs & Inspections – Subcontractors & Suppliers
– Material Costs & Aval. – Plans & Specifications
– Approvals & Acceptance – Project Management
– Supervision & Coord. – Manpower, Prod. & Safety
– Quality & Workmanship – Estimate & Budget
– Factors Beyond Control

So how do you reduce risk and increase your bottom-line? Your choices are many. But consider which will give you the biggest return on your time, energy, and money. In other words, where can your company gain the biggest advantage over your competitors?

– Lower Material Costs
– Better Subs. Costs
– Better Equipment
– Better Supervision
– Better Project Mgmt.
– Labor Productivity